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312 search results for 'Critical Thinking' 'Serious Games' : Publications in Profweb (307) | Skills in ICT Profile (2) | Pages in ICT Profile (2) | Resource in ICT Profile (1)

Publications in Profweb (307)

Real Life Stories

Game Thinking as a Strategy to Promote Deep Learning in Any Field

Published November 20, 2017  | 

Andy Van Drom Editor, Profweb

While observing my students in Cégep Limoilou’s Video Game Design program, I noticed their ability to mobilize a specific skill set comprising critical analysis, problem solving and creativity. As I built the generic course plan for a new course, English for Video Game Design II, I included a gamification project to specifically hone these skills, often referred to as game thinking. After testing this approach with my students in the fall 2017 term, I am convinced it can benefit students in virtually any program.

Articles

Useful Games to Solve Serious Problems

Published November 3, 2016  |  Multidisciplinary

Mélissa Philippe Project Manager, PEEC

In the digital era, several teaching and education establishments have taken the road of gaming as a way to convey knowledge. I took an interest in the developers who put forward games targeting underprivileged populations as a means to respond to diverse problems.

Articles

Game-Based Learning to Increase Social Literacy

Published February 7, 2020  |  Multidisciplinary

Andy Van Drom Editor, Profweb

Exploiting the potential of games to benefit teaching and learning is no longer a novelty, and recent years have seen considerable activity surrounding the use of game mechanics in college education. That said, finding games suitable for learning—so-called serious games—that target specific competencies and are offered free of charge is not always an easy feat. Echoing our fall 2019 article on the CCDMD’s collection of serious games [in French], this text presents 6 serious games that help college students develop their social literacy, a transversal skill important for all college students, regardless of their program.

Articles

IT's Contribution to the Development of Critical Thinking

Published March 25, 2012  |  Multidisciplinary

Benoit Bolduc AQPC Symposia Coordinator, AQPC

Benoit Bolduc, director general of the AQPC (Association québécoise de pédagogie collégiale), presents the program of the upcoming 32nd symposium of the association to be held on June 6, 7 and 8 at Gatineau. Once again this year, the integration of IT in education has an important place at this event.

Articles

Serious Games in College Education and Research – What’s Out There?

Published September 29, 2017  |  Multidisciplinary

Chantal Desrosiers Techno-pedagogical Advisor, MEES

In the fall of 2016, I attended the CIRTA Colloquium (Communauté pour l’innovation et la recherche sur les technologies dans l’enseignement/apprentissage) at Université Laval. One of the streams was devoted to digital game-based learning, in collaboration with the Serious Games Society. Here, I propose to address this topic in terms of possible benefits for the learner, while retracing a set of games available to colleagues across the college network

Articles

Cultivating Critical Thinking -
From Montaigne to the Present

Published November 27, 2011  |  Multidisciplinary

Benoit Bolduc AQPC Symposia Coordinator, AQPC

Benoit Bolduc, Director General of the AQPC (Association québécoise de pédagogie collégiale), presents the theme of its 32nd annual symposium which will take place in the Outaouais region this coming June. He invites the teachers of the Quebec college network as well as all others involved in higher education to respond to the event's call for workshops.

Articles

The College Network Is Getting Serious About Serious Gaming

Published September 28, 2015  |  Multidisciplinary

Ryan W. Moon Editor, Profweb

I believe it was Bill Shakespeare who said “All the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players.” He may have been on to something, as the college network showed its playful side during the Serious Games Conference, held at Vanier College on August 7th, 2015.

Real Life Stories

Fun and Games Using IT

Published January 23, 2011  |  English (Second Language)

Julie Hamel Teacher, Collège de Valleyfield

During Julie Hamel's second time teaching future office workers, she was looking for an original and less teacher-centered way to review what had been covered during the term. She suggested that the class divide into 3 groups and that each group create a board game called ‘The Office'. The rest is IT!

Real Life Stories
ICT Profile

Concept Mapping: A Great Instructional Strategy That Encourages Transfer of Knowledge and Critical Thinking

Published August 30, 2018  |  Fashion Design

Heather Sorella Teacher, Collège LaSalle

A while back, in a marketing strategy course of the Fashion Marketing Program, I integrated a project where students would identify the problems experienced by a fashion retailer who was struggling. They then had to propose solutions, find objectives and strategies and create an action plan. It became a very linear project for the students: 2 assignments of 20 marks each. The students would get into groups of 5 and divide up the work, “You do part A, you do part B and I’ll do part C…” etc. Each student would summit their part and the assignment had very little cohesiveness. I even had to tell the students to at least assign the proofreading of the entire work to one of the members of the group and make sure they all used the same font. I could tell which of the students were doing the work.

Real Life Stories

Joining a Team

Published November 17, 2014  |  Multidisciplinary

Avery Rueb Teacher, Vanier College

In my first story on Profweb, I talked about a serious game that I was working on called Prêt à négocier. Since that first article, I joined Affordance Studio, a serious game studio in Montreal, as a co-founder. If you haven’t heard of the term “serious game” before, they are games that have a goal other than pure entertainment. They are used in education, military, government and health care. They are starting to pop up all over the place. Here is a list of some of the more well-known serious games: Dragon Box, 3D Virtual Operating Room, and Government in Action.

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Featured Reports

Published September 3, 2018

Active Learning

Jean Desjardins Learning Technology Advisor, Collège Sainte-Anne
Isabelle Senécal Director of Teaching, of Pedagogical Innovation and of International Development, Collège Sainte-Anne

The active learning methods have in common of placing the students in the middle of the learning process. Their teachers can then also think about giving them a role in the planning of the evaluation. Active learning is inspired by real-life contexts that are meaningful for the students, which can increase their level of motivation for the tasks that are suggested to them. It encourages durable learnings rather than using only their short-term memory.

Multidisciplinary

Featured Reports

Published October 17, 2019

Digital Tools to Support an Inclusive Pedagogical Practice

Andréanne Turgeon Editor, Profweb
Andy Van Drom Editor, Profweb

This featured report aims to explore the features and possible uses of certain digital tools that can make learning accessible to all students as part of an inclusive pedagogical practice. Following the principles of universal design for learning (UDL), the tools presented, which are free or already part of the technological environment of college teachers, offer students a variety of means of representation, action, expression and engagement.

Multidisciplinary

Real Life Stories

Published May 19, 2017

Bringing Some Fun and Friendly Competition to the College Classroom with Kahoot!

Terri Connolly Teacher, Champlain College - Saint Lawrence

As teachers, we are often looking for new ways to diversify and enhance our teaching strategies. In the fall 2016 semester, I was introduced to Kahoot during a library information session with my Introduction to College English students, given by Nathalie Faure, the Library Technician at our college. The level of excitement and enthusiasm was such that it prompted me to try Kahoot with my first and second year students. I can attest that Kahoot is not only fun, easy to use and engages students, but it is also a tool that can be adapted to different levels and course content.

Multidisciplinary

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