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6 search results for 'Learning Challenges' 'Audio' 'Research Activities' > French (Language and Literature) (6) : Publications in Profweb (6)

Publications in Profweb (6)

Real Life Stories

Active Learning Classrooms in Service of French Lit

Published September 22, 2015  |  French (Language and Literature)

Étienne Bourdages Teacher, Collège Ahuntsic

Just prior to the student strike in 2012, the administration at our college presented an active learning classroom implementation project codenamed CLAAC (for Classe d’apprentissage actif). This initiative was part of a vast reasearch project that brought a few colleges from Quebec together with the Université de Montréal. I’ve been teaching French literature for about 8 years and was interested in experimenting with some new ways of presenting my class. I was already interested in integrating ICTs into my teaching, but I was more or less traditional in my approach. So when the opportunity arose, I jumped at the chance to get involved.

Real Life Stories

Audio Feedback To Give Meaning To Marking

Published November 17, 2017  |  French (Language and Literature)

Jean-François Legault Teacher, Collège de Valleyfield

To mark my students’ essays, I have turned to giving audio feedback. I can see real benefits in this for both my students and me. It gives a lot more meaning to grading. In audio mode the number of detailed comments that can be left increases dramatically when compared to written comments. The number of grade reviews in my classes has also decreased significantly since I have been using this method.

Real Life Stories

Audio Feedback: Customized Follow-up for Students

Published May 3, 2016  |  French (Language and Literature)

Karine Bélair Teacher, Collégial international Sainte-Anne

When I am correcting my students’ assignments in my French or Law courses, I often feel the need to go beyond my correction codes. For me, it seems insufficient to simply mark “unclear” or “requires further development.” How can you clarify? What does “requires further development” mean? I really want to reformulate the sentence that requires clarification, and to outline the explanations in order to provide an example. It’s unfortunate that my handwriting is difficult for students to decipher. It’s also unfortunate that their copy looks like a construction site after I have finished my job of editing, crossing out sentences and adding comments, as much within the text as in the margins… That’s why I tried out a new style of providing feedback – audio feedback.

Real Life Stories

Identifying Reading Disorders at the Collegial Level

Published May 5, 2008  |  French (Language and Literature)

Laura King Teacher, Cégep André-Laurendeau

There’s an undetected population in francophone cegeps that needs screening and accommodation so that they can complete their cegep degrees. It costs the system to provide resources to accommodate people with disabilities, but it's a lot cheaper than the price tag of failure.

Articles

Multitype Feedback: Summary of an article from Pédagogie collégiale

Published August 7, 2018  |  French (Language and Literature)

Catherine Rhéaume Editor, Profweb

Did Karine Bélair’s real life story on giving feedback by audio capsules capture your interest? In Volumes 28 and 29 of Pédagogie collégiale, 2 articles on feedback to students got my attention:

Real Life Stories

My first experience with distance education as a new teacher

Published May 29, 2018  |  French (Language and Literature)

Eang-Nay Theam Teacher, Cégep de Baie-Comeau

In the fall of 2017, during my first year of teaching in a college, I was offered the possibility of giving the second literature course, Littérature et imaginaire (Literature and Imagination), as an evening distance-education class. That class comes after Écriture et littérature (Writing and Literature) (101) and precedes the Littérature québecoise (Literature from Quebec) (103) class. I was giving regular, in-class courses at the same time. I would like to tell you about my experience and share with you some strategies that encourage the students’ engagement. I would like to start by saying that I loved my experience!

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Real Life Stories

Published May 3, 2016

Audio Feedback: Customized Follow-up for Students

Karine Bélair Teacher, Collégial international Sainte-Anne

When I am correcting my students’ assignments in my French or Law courses, I often feel the need to go beyond my correction codes. For me, it seems insufficient to simply mark “unclear” or “requires further development.” How can you clarify? What does “requires further development” mean? I really want to reformulate the sentence that requires clarification, and to outline the explanations in order to provide an example. It’s unfortunate that my handwriting is difficult for students to decipher. It’s also unfortunate that their copy looks like a construction site after I have finished my job of editing, crossing out sentences and adding comments, as much within the text as in the margins… That’s why I tried out a new style of providing feedback – audio feedback.

French (Language and Literature)

Real Life Stories

Published September 22, 2015

Active Learning Classrooms in Service of French Lit

Étienne Bourdages Teacher, Collège Ahuntsic

Just prior to the student strike in 2012, the administration at our college presented an active learning classroom implementation project codenamed CLAAC (for Classe d’apprentissage actif). This initiative was part of a vast reasearch project that brought a few colleges from Quebec together with the Université de Montréal. I’ve been teaching French literature for about 8 years and was interested in experimenting with some new ways of presenting my class. I was already interested in integrating ICTs into my teaching, but I was more or less traditional in my approach. So when the opportunity arose, I jumped at the chance to get involved.

French (Language and Literature)

Real Life Stories

Published May 29, 2018

My first experience with distance education as a new teacher

Eang-Nay Theam Teacher, Cégep de Baie-Comeau

In the fall of 2017, during my first year of teaching in a college, I was offered the possibility of giving the second literature course, Littérature et imaginaire (Literature and Imagination), as an evening distance-education class. That class comes after Écriture et littérature (Writing and Literature) (101) and precedes the Littérature québecoise (Literature from Quebec) (103) class. I was giving regular, in-class courses at the same time. I would like to tell you about my experience and share with you some strategies that encourage the students’ engagement. I would like to start by saying that I loved my experience!

French (Language and Literature)