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Publication by Kevin Lenton

About the Author

He is a Physics Teacher who has been at Vanier College for the last 11 years. For the last 7 years, he has been organizing pedagogical activities in active learning classrooms. Thanks to PAREA grants, he works in collaboration with teachers from other colleges to improve the integration of technology into the classroom. His research team studies how students are using the technology. He is also active as a member of the executive committee of SALTISE, an organization that promotes new pedagogies in the classroom. Kevin is a member of the Editorial Committee of Profweb and an occasional contributor.

Real Life Stories

Geogebra logo

Published April 9, 2019

Using Geogebra within Moodle to Give Physics Students Instantaneous Feedback

Kevin Lenton Teacher, Vanier College

Traditionally, Physics students work with pencil and paper on Physics assessments. In recent semesters, I have been using GeoGebra and Moodle to provide opportunities for my students to interact with Physics-related content and get instantaneous feedback. These tools allow me to better monitor whether they have integrated the learning objectives of my classes and track the friction points, and has ultimately helped to improve their performance in my courses.

Physics

Real Life Stories

Googleformlogo

Published April 13, 2015

Immediate Feedback to Students Using the Branching Feature of Google Forms

Kevin Lenton Teacher, Vanier College

As a basic instructional principle, learners need feedback, and to receive maximum benefit from feedback, it should be supplied as soon as possible after an assessment or ideally after each question. I recently experimented with Google Forms to find a way to provide this immediate feedback.

Physics

Real Life Stories

Published October 31, 2010

Getting Beyond the Equations

Kevin Lenton Teacher, Vanier College

My practical teaching style means I am sometimes surprised by how students can push their own learning when they are motivated. Beyond a basic lesson plan, I observe how students interact with concepts in the classroom and try to teach in response to what I am seeing, often with information technology. One challenge with IT is to discover how the modern generation learns. Their relationship with technology is often very different from my own.

Physics